Monday February 25, 2019

Monday February 25, 2019
Tuesday February 26, 2019
Wednesday February 27, 2019
Confidence: Moderate - We are seeking public financial support to help VIACS maintain our public safety service. If you'd like donate you can do so at the bottom of this page or if you have questions or ideas please email us at forecaster@islandavalanchebulletin.com.

Main Concerns

Persistent Slab, Wind Slab - view Avalanche Problems for detailed information.

Travel & Terrain Advice

During periods of high hazard travel in avalanche terrain is not recommended. When entering avalanche terrain careful snow pack evaluation, cautious route-finding and careful decision making is essential.

Avalanche Summary

Explosive avalanche control and testing over the weekend period produced a few up to size 1.5 avalanches on predominately North aspects. These avalanches where new wind slab avalanches formed during the last storm and where confined to very steep unskiable terrain. Solar effect in the late afternoon warmed steep rocky zones and caused numerous loose dry avalanches all less than size one to occur at lower treeline and below treeline elevations.

Avalanche Problems

Persistent Slab

Down 50 to 80 centimeters facets can be found sitting on top of and below a very dense melt freeze crust. This avalanche problem is widespread can be found on all aspects and elevations and has become stubborn but may be reactive in shallower terrain to light triggers such a skiers. This problem is possible to produce avalanches to size two.

Wind Slab

Strong winds and both new and available snow has created these avalanche problems and are found on predominately northerly aspects but can be found in isolated protected areas on all aspects. The elevations to find these avalanche problems will be In the alpine and at treeline. Wind slabs are currently touchy to light triggers but may after time become less reactive as they begin to settle and bond. If triggered this avalanche problem will produce avalanches to size two.

Snowpack Summary

A reactive and persistent melt freeze crust with facets both above and below can be found at all aspects and elevations

Alpine: variable surface conditions exist scoured, pressed and loaded. New snow from the past snowfall is bonding poorly to the old surface and in the upper and mid snow pack a variety of layers can be found and this includes the faceted melt freeze crust. The mid and lower snow pack is well settled

Tree Line: New snow is low density and on protected areas surface hoar has been buried and can be easily trigger during testing. The faceted Mfcr can be found down between 50 and 80 cm and is reactive during moderate testing. mid and lower snow pack is dense and well settled

Below Treeline: New snow is low density and on protected areas surface hoar has been buried and can be easily trigger during testing. The faceted melt freeze crust can be found down between 50 cm and is reactive during moderate testing. Solar effected aspects are likely to have formed a breakable surface crust. Mid and lower snow pack is dense and well settled.

Snowpack Details

SurfaceNew low density snow, scoured loaded and pressed, all dependent on the orientation to the wind
UpperNew snow up to 20 cm in depth in sheltered areas this can be found on top of surface hoar. Found between 50 and 80 cm in depth a well established melt freeze crust exists with a layer of facets both above and below it.
MidBelow 100 to 120 centimeters a very dense and well settle can be found
LowerWell settled

Past Weather

Moderate snowfall and strong south west winds where followed with clearing conditions and cool air temperatures,

Weather Forecast

Monday: No new snow, Temperature -2 to +1, Light ridge top winds from the North East, Freezing Level to 300 meters.

Tuesday: No new snow, Temperature -1 to -1, Light ridge top winds from the North East, Freezing Level to 300 meters.

Wednesday: No new snow ,Temperature -2 to -9, Light to Moderate ridge top winds from the North East, Freezing Level to 200 meters.

Posted on Monday February 25, 2019 by Jesse Percival

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